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k1mkardashian:

primateculture:

who is she?

she is beauty class and elegance

k1mkardashian:

primateculture:

who is she?

she is beauty class and elegance

yulon:

what if scratching dragons on the head was like how you scratch a bird’s head. they just kinda bend their head at you expecting scritches and pats

abandonedography:

Subway system from 1927 to 1956 in Rochester, New York (via)

abandonedography:

Subway system from 1927 to 1956 in Rochester, New York (via)

pleoros:

Jürgen Heckel - Slide, 2013

Meanwhile, Mac goes from being an embedded reporter in a war zone to sitting in the control room during Will’s show, where she regularly saves him from looking like an idiot on national TV. Maggie volunteers to report from a war-torn region of Africa and narrowly avoids being killed. Sloan Sabbith holds a PhD, goes toe-to-toe with the president of the news division, punches Wall Street jerks, speaks fluent Japanese, and stands up for what she thinks is right, even when it means physically threatening her executive producer. Leona Lansing owns the network and, it’s safe to say, scares the shit out of almost everyone, including her male subordinates.

The Newsroom is chuck-full of robust female characters. When faced with flawed women, we find ourselves utterly incapable of appreciating them for who they are as characters. Instead, we see them as universal representations of their gender, which means Sorkin doesn’t have a “woman problem.” We do.

Feminism, as a movement, constantly begs Hollywood to depict, “real” female characters. We refuse to accept the overly sexualized “hero” like Cat Woman or the sexless, overworked bitch like Miranda Priestly. We’re starving for smart, funny, flawed female characters who, if they don’t actually “have it all,” are struggling to get there like the rest of us. But, when we actually see those characters on TV, we immediately complain about what we said we wanted all along — we turn on the writers of those shows for not crafting the “perfect” female character.

The Newsroom’ Doesn’t Have a Woman Problem by Natalie Smith

MIC DROP

(via recycledstars)

Lets just slow clap it out and also, this is basically everything I wanted to say, but they said it better.

(via ellie5192)

the-goddamazon:

stand-up-comic-gifs:

Baron Vaughn (x)

SHRIEKING

If you are a writer, and you have a novel idea that you are excited about writing, write it. Don’t go on message boards and ask random Internet denizens whether or not something is allowed. … Who is the writer here? YOU ARE. Whose book is it? YOUR BOOK. There are no writing police. No one is going to arrest you if you write a teen vampire novel post Twilight. No one is going to send you off to a desert island to live a wretched life of worm eating and regret because your book includes things that could be seen as cliché.

If you have a book that you want to write, just write the damn thing. Don’t worry about selling it; that comes later. Instead, worry about making your book good. Worry about the best way to order your scenes to create maximum tension, worry about if your character’s actions are actually in character; worry about your grammar. DON’T worry about which of your stylistic choices some potential future editor will use to reject you, and for the love of My Little Ponies don’t worry about trends. Trying to catching a trend is like trying to catch a falling knife—dangerous, foolhardy, and often ending in tears, usually yours.

I’m not saying you shouldn’t pay attention to what’s getting published; keeping an eye on what’s going on in your market is part of being a smart and savvy writer. But remember that every book you see hitting the shelves today was sold over a year ago, maybe two. Even if you do hit a trend, there’s no guarantee the world won’t be totally different by the time that book comes out. The only certainty you have is your own enthusiasm and love for your work. …

If your YA urban fantasy features fairies, vampires, and selkies and you decide halfway through that the vampires are over-complicating the plot, that is an appropriate time to ax the bloodsuckers. If you decide to cut them because you’re worried there are too many vampire books out right now, then you are betraying yourself, your dreams, and your art.

If you’re like pretty much every other author in the world, you became a writer because you had stories you wanted to tell. Those are your stories, and no one can tell them better than you can. So write your stories, and then edit your stories until you have something you can be proud of. Write the stories that excite you, stories you can’t wait to share with the world because they’re just so amazing. If you want to write Murder She Wrote in space with anime-style mecha driven by cats, go for it. Nothing is off limits unless you do it badly.

And if you must obsess over something, obsess over stuff like tension and pacing and creating believable characters. You know, the shit that matters. There are no writing police. This is your story, no one else’s. Tell it like you want to.

Rachel Aaron (via relatedworlds)

Yeah, so, this answers a lot of asks I get. It’s also why YW focuses on technique and style, and less on content and research.

(via clevergirlhelps)

This is so important

(via freddlounds)

File this under things I don’t remember reblogging, and another post where my comment isn’t sourced (but obv it was me cause it says YW!).

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

castiel-the-wayward-angel:

this was cinematic perfection

castiel-the-wayward-angel:

this was cinematic perfection